What can my baby see? (And how much can we sneak about?)

When Little Z was born I was pretty clueless about all things baby and assumed he could see us properly right from when he was a newborn. We spent a lot of time thinking he was smiling up at us and searching us out across a room. “Oh look, he’s looking. Oh look, he’s smiling at me”. That sort of thing. It was only a bit later I found babies can’t actually see that much when they’re born and they rely heavily on their sense of smell and touch in the beginning. Their vision develops as they get older, with their central vision a lot clearer than the periphery vision. I should have known all this, I’m sure I learnt it in biology at school but when you have a cute little baby smiling up you then you’re going to take the credit for it aren’t you?

Did you know? A newborn sees shapes, light and movement, but only in shades of grey.

What can a baby see

What can a baby see

This time round with Baby E we were a bit more knowledgeable and as he’s gotten older he’s been nick named “the little cling on”. He is currently going through separation anxiety to the highest degree and doesn’t like us leaving his sight for even a couple of seconds. We tend to distract him until he’s immersed in some toy or having fun in the jumperoo and then try to quickly sneak off to do that urgent errand very very quickly. Of course he quickly realises that all is not as it should be and, as long as he can’t see anyone, is ok for a bit. It’s when he’s little eagle eyes spot us moving about like quiet ninjas in the kitchen that he screams blue murder until he’s found his glued-onto-hip-koala position again. I had a little fun with this tool and smiled to myself when I found Baby E can actually see quite a lot now that’s almost 9 months old. So really, there is no escape. We wait patiently hoping separation anxiety passes by quickly.

Vision Direct has launched an online tool to show parents what their baby’s sight might be like as he or she grows older. Using the simple interface, parents can quickly shift from a newborn’s first view to the fully developed vision of a 12 month old child. This nifty little tool lets you drag the little icon so that you can see what a baby would see at a particular age.

What can a baby see at 6 months? Did you know: A 6 month old baby can move her eyes quickly to follow moving objects and is beginning to understand object permanence.

What can a baby see at 6 months

What can a baby see at 6 months

At 10 months this will be what Baby E’s vision is like. At 10 months old, a baby’s eyes will be the colour that they’ll stay when she’s grown up; give or take a shade or two.

What can a baby see at 10 months

As you can see, our sneaking about days are very numbered indeed. We are going have to learn more ninja moves to sneak about. Possibly throw in some camouflaged outfits too.


  1. Pippa Ainsworth June 10, 2016 / 1:03 pm

    I know that this didn’t occur to me when Bud was small either, I guess that’s why they are do drawn to bright monochrome toys when they are tiny!

  2. Lorraine June 10, 2016 / 4:22 pm

    I absolutely did not know this, it’s very interesting.

  3. Erin Ek Rush June 10, 2016 / 4:34 pm

    Ah, that’s cool -it’s a good idea fora graphic! I read about babies’ not seeing very far in one of my baby books but like you I couldn’t really imagine then not being able to see my face when they were looking at me!

  4. Anya Harris June 11, 2016 / 12:06 am

    Well this explains a great deal. Very interesting and informative 🙂

  5. Becky Cowley June 13, 2016 / 4:41 pm

    Graphics are brilliant, i knew that babies didn’t have full sight but didn’t realise this! Great post!

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